Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Remember your pets at Thanksgiving.....

.....not just to give thanks for having them in your life, but to make sure they are as safe and stress free as they can be!




  • Lots of people will be coming and going, with doors often open!  Make sure your pets have proper identification on them should they get out
  • Holiday snacks aren't as good for pets as they are for people!  Keep those munchies, especially chocolate, onions, raisins, grapes and peanuts, out of their reach
  • Poultry and meat bones should NEVER be given to pets.  They can splinter and cause damage to the digestive tract
  • Help your pet find a quiet sanctuary, away from the noise, the crowds and the temptation!  A nice bed, blanket or cozy crate may be just what they need to escape the craziness!  Add a fresh bowl of water that won't be knocked over by guests
  • Remind your guests to respect your pets, ask them not to feed them, pull on them or tease them, especially younger guests!
  • Make sure clean up time is also free from any 'non food' left overs.....like aluminum foil, wax paper and other food wrappings.  And keep the garbage secured or out of reach immediately!
This doesn't mean you pet can't have fun!  Check out these great Thanksgiving Day Treats from the Animal Planet!



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Thanksgiving Treats!



These are some great Thanksgiving treats you can make for your pets!  Yum!!

Fall Pumpkin Pie Dog Treats

Ingredients: 





  • 1 ½ cups flour
  • 1 cup oatmeal
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • 2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin
  • ¼ cup peanut butter
  • ¼ cup water

    Instructions: 
  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Mix flour, oats, baking powder, cinnamon and ginger 
  • Add vegetable oil and mix until crumbly (use a mixer or mix by hand) 
  • Add peanut butter and pumpkin, mix well 
  • Add water and mix until batter forms a dough 
  • Roll dough on floured surface until approximately ¼ inch think. Cut into shapes. A small pumpkin, cat or holiday cookie cutter shape works great depending on the season! 
  • Place treats on a cookie sheet. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes until they are dry and firm
  • Turn off oven and leave in the oven for an additional 20 to 30 minutes 
  • Remove from oven and cool 
  • Store in a closed cookie tin 
  • Enjoy!

    Fido's Favorite Sweet Potato Pie Treats

    Ingredients: 
  • 1 ½ cups flour
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • 2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ cup cooked sweet potato, mashed
  • 2 slices of cooked crumbled bacon – alternatively you can use ¼ cup bacon bits
  • ¼ cup water

    Instructions: 
  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Mix flours, baking powder, cinnamon and ginger 
  • Add vegetable oil and mix until crumbly (use a mixer or mix by hand) 
  • Add mashed sweet potato and bacon, mix well
  • Add water and mix until batter forms a dough
  • Roll dough on floured surface until approximately ¼ inch think. Cut into shapes. A small pumpkin, cat or holiday cookie cutter shape works great depending on the season! 
  • Place treats on a cookie sheet, bake for 12 to 15 minutes until they are dry and firm 
  • Turn off oven and leave in the oven for an additional 20 to 30 minutes 
  • Remove from oven and cool 
  • Store in a closed cookie tin 
  • Enjoy!

  • Pumpkin Pie Cookies (for cats and dogs!)
    • 2 cups rice flour
    • 1/2 cup oatmeal
    • 1 cup canned pumpkin
    • 1 cup grated carrots
    • 1/2 cup unsweetened plain applesauce
    • 1/4 flour for rolling
    • In a food processor blend carrots, applesauce and pumpkin until smooth
    • Mix rice flour and oatmeal in a bowl
    • Add wet ingredients to the dry and mix gently until dough forms
    • On a floured breadboard place dough and roll out to about 1/4 inch in thickness
    • Use cookie cutter to cut out little cookies
    • Place cookies on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for seven minutes
    • Flip treats over and cook for five more minutes
    • Remove from oven and cool thoroughly

    Special Note
    Remember, these recipes are treats and should not replace your pet’s regular meals. Please check with your veterinarian if your pet has special dietary needs or food allergies.

    Tuesday, November 18, 2014

    What to do with your pet’s dry skin in the winter?





    We humans aren't the only ones who suffer from dry skin in the winter!  Our dogs’ and cats' coats can get dry and course and some of this can be caused by a deficiency of fatty acids in their diet.  Without these essential fatty acids, wounds won’t heal, kidneys can degenerate and glands can dry up.  You can supplement your pets diet with fatty acids like vegetable oils (safflower, sunflower, etc.).  

    However, the best source is fish oil.  You can even give it to your pooch as a treat!

    Wednesday, November 12, 2014

    November is PET CANCER AWARENESS Month



    Tumors can develop from any tissue and there are many types of tumors that can occur in a variety of locations. The more you know about tumor types can help you monitor your dog and catch possible cancers early, which may help treat the disease before it is too late.

    Knowing the possible signs that your dog may have a cancerous tumor will help in early detection. These symptoms are not necessarily indicative of cancer, but if a pet begins to exhibit any of them, or a combination of symptoms, you should visit your veterinarian immediately.
     
    1. Lump and bumps: Not all lumps and bumps are cancerous. If you find one on your dog, call your veterinarian. Your pet may need a needle biopsy to determine if the cells are cancerous or not.
    2. Abnormal Odors: Many dogs generally have "doggy breath". If your dog's breath becomes more odorous than normal for your dog, he should be seen by a veterinarian. Foul smelling odors could be a sign of mouth or nose cancers. If your dog has other odors that are not normal for him, such as odors from the ears, or other parts of his body, he should be checked out.
    3. Discharges: This includes blood, pus, vomiting, diarrhea and any other abnormal substance being discharged from any part of your dog's body.
    4. Non-Healing wounds: Wounds that are not healing, such as cuts on their paw or face, could be a sign of infection, skin disease or melanoma.
    5. Extreme or rapid weight loss: Talk to your veterinarian if your dog is not on a diet and you notice a sudden loss in weight. Generally dogs don't stop eating unless there is a reason, and cancer is only one possibility.
    6. Lack of energy: Sleeping more than usual, lack of energy at playtime, getting overly tired on normal walks are all possible signs of cancer.
    7. Changes in urine or stool: blood in the urine or stool, frequent bathroom usage, unusual accidents in the home, difficulty in going to the bathroom are all possible signs of cancer or another ailment.
     
    Most treatment plans will involve some type of surgery to remove the tumor. Depending on the tumor type and location, your veterinarian may recommend adding other treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Many times veterinarians are able to provide treatment in their clinic, but other times you may need to refer to a veterinary oncologist.

    Source:   Bark Busters

    Tuesday, November 11, 2014

    Training Tips for Your Dog

    Here are some tips we have collected over the years working with your pets!
    Feel free to add some of your own.....or, if you have a special challenge you need help with, let us know!      
    • You get what you reinforce - not necessarily what you want
    If your dog exhibits a behavior you don't like, there is a strong likelihood that it's something that has been reinforced before. A great example is when your dog brings you a toy and barks to entice you to throw it. You throw the toy. Your dog has just learned that barking gets you to do what he wants. You say "no," and he barks even more. Heaven forbid you give in and throw the toy now! Why? Because you will have taught him persistence pays off. Before you know it you'll have a dog that barks and barks every time he wants something. The solution? Ignore his barking or ask him to do something for you (like "sit") before you throw his toy.